Annie Zeffertt Annie Zeffertt  ‎(I202)‎
Surname: Zeffertt
Given Names: Annie

Gender: Female
      

Birth: 1863 27 26 London, England
Death: 16 June 1896 ‎(Age 33)‎ Ile Molene
Personal Facts and Details
Birth 1863 27 26 London, England
Latitude: N51.517 Longitude: W0.100

Marriage Moses Morris - 2 January 1884 ‎(Age 21)‎ Portsea, Hampshire, England
Latitude: N50.799 Longitude: W1.108

Death 16 June 1896 ‎(Age 33)‎ Ile Molene
Latitude: N48.398 Longitude: W4.958

Cause of death: Drowned
Globally unique Identifier 1D5D9F577F601F4790B3FF7562E89DB70A02
Last Change 16 April 2009 - 14:48:23 - by: torven
View Details for ...

Parents Family  (F94)
Henry Zeffertt
1836 - 1905
Kate Gittel Mnasheh
1837 - 1911
Fanny Zeffertt
1858 - 1914
Charles Zeffertt
1860 - 1862
Private
-
Annie Zeffertt
1863 - 1896
Michael Zeffertt
1865 - 1886
Rachael Zeffertt
1867 -
Kate Zeffertt
1869 -
Lewis Zeffertt
1872 - 1872

Immediate Family  (F115)
Moses Morris
1863 - 1899
Leon Morris
1886 - 1896
Sidney Morris
1887 - 1896
‎(unknown)‎ Morris
1894 -


Notes

Note
account from The Dictionary of Disasters At Sea:

The Drummond Castle left Cape Town for London on May 28th, 1896, with 143 passengers and 103 crew under command of Capt. W. W. Pierce. On the night of June 16th she was off Ushant and within one day's steaming of home. The sea was calm but visibility was poor.

The strong currents converging on the island of Molene, off Ushant, make the locality one of the most dangerous in the world for navigators, and the extent to which the Drummond Castle was pulled eastwards by the tide was apparently not realised. Between 10 and 11 o'clock that evening the liner was sighted by the steamship Werfa, the first officer of which noted that she was off her course and heading for a dangerous coast. The vessels were about a quarter of a mile apart at the time and soon afterwards the Drummond Castle was lost to view. Shortly before 11 p.m., still steaming at 12 knots, she struck a reef of rocks known as the Pierres Vertes, at the south entrance to the Fronveur Sound. The captain believed the vessel to be driven firmly on the rocks, and although the boats were made ready they were not lowered. The Chief Engineer released steam from the boilers to prevent an explosion, but all efforts to keep the ship afloat were useless and she foundered within four minutes of striking.

The drowned numbered 243, of whom Capt. Pierce, his officers and crew accounted for 101, and the passengers for 142. The three saved were Mr. Charles Marquandt, a first class passenger, Quartermaster Wood and Seaman Godbolt, all rescued by Breton fishermen.

Note
The Hampshire Telegraph, Saturday, June 27, 1896

The Lost Liner.
Relief Fund Opened.
The Naval Passengers.

With the publication of an amended list of passengers lost in the Castle liner Drummond Castle all doubt is removed concerning the fate of Mrs H. M. Morris and her two little sons, aged eleven and nine years respectively. Mrs Morris, who was the daughter of Mr Zeffert, of POrtsea, was thirty-two yeras of age. Her husband held an influential position at Salisbury, Mashonaland, and she went out from Southampton with her boys to join him three years ago. Mr Morris having been at the Cape five years. The lads were placed in a school at Cape Town, and this establishment having now broken up, Mr. and Mrs. Morris decided to have the boys finish their education in England, and a college at Bristol was selected for them. Mrs Morris wrote to her sister at Southampton saying that she was coming to visit her friends at Southampton, Portsmouth, and London, for six months, and at the same time would bring the boys with her. In her letter just before leaving the Cape she said she was so excited to think she was coming to england again that she could scarcely express herself in the letter. Her friends here first received intimation of the disaster on the 18th instant, and next morning saw her name in the list of the drowned. The friends, hoping that the boys were not with her, wired to the school at Cape Town to know if they had left, but got a very short, but at the same time comprehensive reply, in two words, "Sorry, Drummond."

Note
D Haws 1990 Merchant Fleets, Vol. 18, Union, Castle and Union-Castle Lines TCL.

Her last voyage, under the command of Capt. W.W. Pierce, began at Cape Town on 28 May 1896; she had on board 143 passengers and 103 crew. On 16 June, she became lost in poor visibility off Ushant, in a sea so calm that no breakers were present to warn of impending hazards. A passing ship, Werfa, noted in her log shortly before the disaster that D.C. seemed off course and heading dangerously.

After she struck, the captain believed she was hard aground, so he ordered the boats to be made ready and let off steam. But she was not aground, having actually overshot the rocks, and was so badly damaged that she sank in four minutes, with no boats having been launched and with only three survivors. Fifty-three bodies were recovered, of which 51 were identified through the assistance of Alphonse Bertillon of France's Criminal Investigation Dept., who was given a gold medal by Queen Victoria.

A 1929 Italian salvage crew searching for gold bullion aboard P&O's Egypt located the hull of D.C. and discovered that the rocks had caused a long gash that ran from the keel to the waterline.

Note
from the New York Times:
­http­://­query­.­nytimes­.­com­/­mem­/­archive­-­free­/­pdf­?­res­=­9E00E7DA1F38E533A6575BC1A9609C94679ED7CF­

South Africa Magazine, 1896
July 4 ­http­://­www­.­genealogyworld­.­net­/­write­/­drummond­.­html­
July 11 ­http­://­www­.­genealogyworld­.­net­/­ellen­/­drummond_b­.­htm­
July 18 ­http­://­www­.­genealogyworld­.­net­/­ellen­/­drummond_c­.­htm­
Sept 12 ­http­://­www­.­genealogyworld­.­net­/­ellen­/­drummond_d­.­htm­ official report

Information on the Union Castle Line ‎(includes piccy of Drummond Castle:
­http­://­www­.­merchantnavyofficers­.­com­/­castle­.­html­

Database of Clydeside Built Ships:
­http­://­www­.­clydesite­.­co­.­uk­/­clydebuilt­/­viewship­.­asp­?­id­=­545­

Note
The Dictionary of Disasters At Sea:

The Drummond Castle left Cape Town for London on May 28th, 1896, with 143 passengers and 103 crew under command of Capt. W. W. Pierce. On the night of June 16th she was off Ushant and within one day's steaming of home. The sea was calm but visibility was poor.

The strong currents converging on the island of Molene, off Ushant, make the locality one of the most dangerous in the world for navigators, and the extent to which the Drummond Castle was pulled eastwards by the tide was apparently not realised. Between 10 and 11 o'clock that evening the liner was sighted by the steamship Werfa, the first officer of which noted that she was off her course and heading for a dangerous coast. The vessels were about a quarter of a mile apart at the time and soon afterwards the Drummond Castle was lost to view. Shortly before 11 p.m., still steaming at 12 knots, she struck a reef of rocks known as the Pierres Vertes, at the south entrance to the Fronveur Sound. The captain believed the vessel to be driven firmly on the rocks, and although the boats were made ready they were not lowered. The Chief Engineer released steam from the boilers to prevent an explosion, but all efforts to keep the ship afloat were useless and she foundered within four minutes of striking.

The drowned numbered 243, of whom Capt. Pierce, his officers and crew accounted for 101, and the passengers for 142. The three saved were Mr. Charles Marquandt, a first class passenger, Quartermaster Wood and Seaman Godbolt, all rescued by Breton fishermen.

Note
South Africa Magazine
­http­://­www­.­genealogyworld­.­net­/­ellen­/­drummond_b­.­htm­
TWO OF THE VICTIMS

Among the passengers on board the Union Company’s steamship Athenian ‎(Captain Martin)‎, which arrived at Plymouth on Saturday night, was Mr. M. H. Morris, auctioneer to the British South Africa Company in Mashonaland. It appears that his wife, who was Miss Zefferrett, of a Jewish family formerly resident in Plymouth, embarked at Natal for England in the Drummond Castle. When the vessel reached Cape Town, Mrs. Morris, who was in a weak state of health, went to the boarding school where her two sons, Leon and Sidney, aged 10 and 9 respectively, were being educated, and made arrangements for them to accompany her to England. She secured berths by permission of the Captain, and even the husband did not know they had traveled with their mother in the Drummond Castle. The two children must therefore be added to the number of victims. Mr. Morris joined the Athenian at Cape Town in the full hope and expectation of spending a holiday home with his wife. There he learned that she had taken the children with her, and all his hopes were crushed when, on reaching Madeira, he was informed that the Drummond Castle had foundered with his family. Mr. Morris, who is prostrate with grief, has offered large rewards for the recovery of the bodies of his wife and children.

View Notes for ...


Sources
There are no Source citations for this individual.

View Sources for ...


Media

Multimedia Object
The TimesThe Times  ‎(M14)‎
Type: Newspaper


Multimedia Object
The Drummond CastleThe Drummond Castle  ‎(M27)‎
Type: Photo


Note: ­http­://­www­.­merchantnavyofficers­.­com­/­UnionCastle­/­drummond­.­jpg­

Multimedia Object
Illustrated London News 27 June 1896Illustrated London News 27 June 1896  ‎(M28)‎
View Media for ...


Family with Parents
Father
Henry Zeffertt ‎(I193)‎
Birth 1836 34 Poland
Death 1 January 1905 ‎(Age 69)‎ Portsmouth, Hampshire, England
1 year
Mother
 
Kate Gittel Mnasheh ‎(I205)‎
Birth 1837 Poland
Death 20 September 1911 ‎(Age 74)‎ Portsmouth, Hampshire, England

Marriage:   -- Unknown
#1
Sister
Fanny Zeffertt ‎(I216)‎
Birth 1858 22 21 Poland
Death 25 May 1914 ‎(Age 56)‎ Portsmouth, Hampshire, England
2 years
#2
Brother
Charles Zeffertt ‎(I1522)‎
Birth about 1860 24 23
Death 29 June 1862 ‎(Age 2)‎ St Botolph, East London, England
#3
Brother
#4
Annie Zeffertt ‎(I202)‎
Birth 1863 27 26 London, England
Death 16 June 1896 ‎(Age 33)‎ Ile Molene
2 years
#5
Brother
Michael Zeffertt ‎(I209)‎
Birth 9 January 1865 29 28 East London, London, England
Death 6 March 1886 ‎(Age 21)‎ German Hospital, Hackney, London, England
2 years
#6
Sister
Rachael Zeffertt ‎(I275)‎
Birth 1867 31 30 London, England
2 years
#7
Sister
Kate Zeffertt ‎(I210)‎
Birth 1869 33 32 Portsea, Hampshire, England
3 years
#8
Brother
Lewis Zeffertt ‎(I276)‎
Birth 6 April 1872 36 35 Portsea, Hampshire, England
Death 6 April 1872 Portsea, Hampshire, England
Family with Moses Morris
Husband
Moses Morris ‎(I374)‎
Birth about 1863
Death about 1899 ‎(Age 36)‎ Salisbury, Rhodesia
Annie Zeffertt ‎(I202)‎
Birth 1863 27 26 London, England
Death 16 June 1896 ‎(Age 33)‎ Ile Molene

Marriage: 2 January 1884 -- Portsea, Hampshire, England
2 years
#1
Son
Leon Morris ‎(I1511)‎
Birth about 1886 23 23
Death 1896 ‎(Age 10)‎ Ile Molene
1 year
#2
Son
Sidney Morris ‎(I1512)‎
Birth about 1887 24 24
Death 16 June 1896 ‎(Age 9)‎ Ile Molene
7 years
#3
Son
‎(unknown)‎ Morris ‎(I1370)‎
Birth 18 May 1894 31 31 Greenwood, Salisbury, Rhodesia